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Sharepoint 2010 : How to Back Up a SQL Server 2008 Database (part 1)

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6/9/2011 9:23:46 AM
The following steps walk you through the process necessary to back up a database in SQL Server 2008 through the SQL Server Management Studio GUI tool. These steps are designed to give you an idea of what you need to consider when backing up your own databases and how you could go about the process. As covered later in this section, this is not the only way to back up your SharePoint databases through SQL Server, and it may not be the best option for you to choose, but it is a starting point from which you can better understand how SQL Server handles database backups.

Note

The user executing the backup must, at a minimum, have been granted the db_backupoperator security role within the target database server to back up a database.


  1. Open SQL Server Management Studio and connect to the SQL Server database instance hosting the database you want to back up. Figure 1 depicts the connection dialog box shown when opening SQL Server Management Studio.

    Figure 1. Enter the connection information for the target SQL Server database instance to connect to it via SQL Server Management Studio.

    Note

    SQL Server Management Studio is the graphical user interface (GUI) client management tool provided with SQL Server 2008 to administrate database instances and databases running on the platform. It is installed by default on all servers hosting SQL Server 2008 and can be individually installed on client computers to allow for connections to remote SQL Server hosts.


  2. Once SQL Server Management Studio connects to the target database instance and opens, the contents of the instance are displayed in the tree view of the Object Explorer pane (which, by default, opens on the left side of the window). Expand the Databases entry in the Object Explorer, and find the name of the database targeted for backup. See Figure 2 for an example.

    Figure 2. SQL Server Management Studio with a database selected for backup.

  3. Right-click on the name of the database, select the Tasks option when the menu opens, and then click on the Back Up option (as shown in Figure 3) to open the Back Up Database dialog box.

    Figure 3. The Tasks Back Up menu option in SQL Server Management Studio.

  4. The Back Up Database dialog box opens, allowing you to customize the backup operation to meet your needs. On the General page (see Figure 4), you can configure the source database for the backup and determine the backup type, the components to be backed up, the backup set associated with the backup, and the destination for the file(s) created by the backup operation. The Options page (see Figure 5) allows you to configure settings for overwriting existing backup files, backup reliability testing, and handling of transaction logs and tape drives by the backup operation. After you have configured the backup settings according to your requirements, click the OK button to start the backup operation.

    Figure 4. The General page of the Back Up Database dialog box.

    Figure 5. The Options page of the Back Up Database dialog box.

    Note

    The Script drop-down menu (see Figure 6) at the top of the Back Up Database dialog box allows you to create a Transact-SQL (T-SQL) script that can be executed to back up your database without the GUI interface described in these steps. The script created by this process uses the same configuration settings that you selected in the dialog box. This allows you to configure your database backup using a user-friendly tool and convert those settings into a format that an experienced database administrator can use to automate the backup process.

    Figure 6. The Script drop-down menu of the Back Up Database dialog box.

  5. As the backup runs, the Progress box in the lower-left corner of the dialog box (see Figure 7) displays a percentage indicating how much of the backup operation has been completed. There is also a link displayed below the Progress indicator allowing you to cancel the operation.

    Figure 7. The Progress indicator shows the status of the backup operation as it runs.
  6. After the backup is finished, a message box stating The backup of database <your database’s name> completed successfully is displayed (see Figure 8). Click the OK button to return to the SQL Server Management Studio main window.

    Figure 8. When the backup operation is completed, SQL Server Management Studio displays a completion dialog box.

Before moving on to how to restore the target database from the backup file you just created, take a moment to review the configuration options available for your SQL Server backups. As noted in step 4, you have quite a few options available for configuring your database backup to meet your specific needs. If possible, it’s a good idea to discuss these options with your database administrator before implementing them to confirm the correct course of action to take for your system.

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