Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Server

Exchange Server 2010 : Setting Up Public Folders (part 1) - Creating Public Folders & Configuring Public Folder Permissions

3/26/2011 6:19:30 PM
Exchange stores public folders in special databases known as public folder databases. You can create public folders only if there is an existing public folder database. When you install the first mailbox server in an Exchange organization, the setup wizard will prompt you as to whether computers running Outlook 2003 or Microsoft Entourage are present in your organization. If you answer yes, Exchange setup creates the public folder database and public folders necessary to support offline address book (OAB) distribution for these messaging clients. Computers running Outlook 2007 and Outlook 2010 do not require public folder infrastructure support for OAB distribution.

Exchange allows for two public folder trees: the Default Public Folders tree and the System Public Folders tree. These folder trees host the following folder types:

  • Default Public Folders (IPM_Subtree) The folders in this tree are commonly accessed by users through applications such as Outlook. Administrators create folders under this public folder tree.

  • System Public Folders (Non_IPM_Subtree) The folders in this tree are accessed indirectly by users, such as clients using older versions of Outlook accessing the OAB. System folders hosted in this tree include EFORMS REGISTRY, OFFLINE ADDRESS BOOK, and SCHEDULE+ FREE BUSY, as shown in Figure 1.

When designing a public folder hierarchy that will host a large number of public folders, you should aim toward a deep hierarchy rather than a wide hierarchy. A deep hierarchy is one that has many vertically nested folders. A wide hierarchy has many high-level folders but few subfolders nested under each folder. You should favor deep hierarchies over wide hierarchies, as deep hierarchies provide better performance during replication.

Figure 1. System public folders


1. Creating Public Folders

You use the Public Folder Management Console, which is located in the Toolbox node of the EMC, to create and manage public folders. To create a public folder in the EMC, perform the following general steps:

  1. Open the Public Folder Management Console from the Toolbox node of the EMC.

  2. In the Public Folder Management Console, navigate to Default Public Folders. If you want to create a public folder within an existing folder, navigate to that folder under the public folders node. Once you have selected the location in which you wish to create the public folder, click New Public Folder in the Actions pane. This will bring up the New Public Folder Wizard, shown in Figure 2. Enter the name of the public folder and then click New.

To create a new public folder using the EMS, use the New-PublicFolder cmdlet. For example, to create a new public folder named Child-Folder under the ExamplePublicFolder on server van-ex2.adatum.com, execute the following command:

New-PublicFolder -Name 'Child-Folder' -Path '\ExamplePublicFolder' -Server 'van-ex2
.adatum.com'



Note:

CREATING PUBLIC FOLDERS

To learn more about creating public folders, consult the following article on TechNet: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb691104.aspx.


Figure 2. Create a new public folder


2. Configuring Public Folder Permissions

You assign permissions to public folders by assigning roles. The Exchange 2010 predefined public folder roles are Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, PublishingAuthor, Author, Non-EditingAuthor, Reviewer, and Contributor. These predefined public folder roles are collections of client user access rights. The Owner role includes all client user access rights, whereas the Contributor role includes only two. The following is a list of client user access rights and the roles that hold them:

  • ReadItems The user can read items in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, PublishingAuthor, Author, Non-EditingAuthor, and Reviewer roles have this right.

  • CreateItems The user can post items to the public folder. The user can send email messages to the public folder if the public folder is mail-enabled. The Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, Publishing Author, Author, Non-EditingAuthor, and Contributor roles have this right.

  • EditOwnedItems The user can edit items he or she owns in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, Publishing Author, and Author roles have this right.

  • DeleteOwnedItems The user can delete items he or she owns in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, Publishing Author, and Author roles have this right.

  • EditAllItems The user can edit any items in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, and Editor roles have this right.

  • DeleteAllItems The user can delete any items in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, Editor, and PublishingAuthor roles have this right.

  • CreateSubfolders The user can create subfolders in the public folder. The Owner, PublishingEditor, and PublishingAuthor roles have this right.

  • FolderOwner The user can view and move the folder, create subfolders, and configure permissions. This access right does not allow the user to read, edit, delete, or create items. Only the Owner role has this right.

  • FolderContact The user is the contact for the public folder. Only the Owner role has this right.

  • FolderVisible The user can view the public folder but does not have read or edit rights for items in the folder. All roles have this right.

You view and assign permissions to public folders using the EMS. You cannot use the EMC to view information about or assign permissions to public folders. Depending on the type of permission you are viewing, there are two different cmdlets you can use to view public folder permissions. To view administrative permissions settings, use the Get-PublicFolderAdministrativePermission cmdlet. To view client permissions settings, use the Get-PublicFolderClientPermission cmdlet. For example, to view administrative access rights for the Research public folder, issue the following command:

Get-PublicFolderAdministrativePermission -Identity "\Research" | Format-List

To view the list of client access permissions to the Research public folder, issue the following command:
Get-PublicFolderClientPermission -Identity "\Research" | Format-List

To assign client permissions to a public folder, use the Add-PublicFolderClientPermission cmdlet. For example, to configure Rooslan with the Publishing Editor permission to the Research folder, issue the following command:

Add-PublicFolderClientPermission -Identity "\Research" -AccessRights PublishingEditor
-User Rooslan

There are two methods through which you can grant users administrative permissions to a public folder. You can add the user to the Public Folder Management role group or you can use the Add-PublicFolderAdministrativePermission cmdlet. For example, to add Oksana to the Public Folder Management role group, use the following command:
Add-RoleGroupMember -Identity "Public Folder Management" -Member Oksana

You can use the Add-PublicFolderAdministrativePermission cmdlet to assign more detailed permissions than those provided through role group membership. For example, to add the AllExtendedRights permission to Ian for the public folder Development and all folders under it in the public folder hierarchy, issue the following command:

Add-PublicFolderAdministrativePermission -Identity "\Development" -User "Ian"
-AccessRights AllExtendedRights -InheritanceType SelfAndChildren



Note:

MANAGING PUBLIC FOLDER PERMISSIONS

To learn more about configuring permissions for public folders, consult the following article on TechNet: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb310789.aspx.

Other -----------------
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 7)
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 6)
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 5)
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 4) - Deploying Printers
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 3) - Creating Application Control Policies
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 2) - Creating a Software Restriction Policy
- Windows Server 2008 R2 : Managing Computers with Domain Policies (part 1)
- BizTalk 2010 Recipes : Document Schemas - Defining Regular Expressions
- BizTalk 2010 Recipes : Creating Complex Types
- Windows Server 2008 High Availability : Load Balancing (part 2) - Load-Balancing Hardware & Load Balancing and SharePoint Farm Topology
 
 
Top 10 video Game
-   Renoir [PS4/XOne/PC] Kickstarter Trailer
-   Poly Bridge [PC] Early Access Trailer
-   Renoir [PS4/XOne/PC] Gameplay Explanation Trailer
-   Renoir [PS4/XOne/PC] More About Trailer
-   King's Quest: A Knight to Remember [PS3/PS4/X360/XOne/PC] Complete Collection Trailer
-   Samurai Warriors Chronicles 3 | Announcement Trailer
-   FIFA 16 | No Touch Dribbling with Lionel Messi
-   Why We're Cautiously Optimistic For The Final Fantasy VII Remake
-   Civilization: Beyond Earth – Rising Tide [PC] E3 Gameplay Walkthrough
-   Why We're Excited For the FFVII Remake
-   Mortal Kombat X | Predator Brutality
-   Mortal Kombat X | Predator Fatality
-   Poly Bridge [PC] Early Access Trailer
-   Silence: The Whispered World 2 [PS4/XOne/PC] Cinematic Trailer
-   Devilian [PC] Debut Trailer
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular keywords
HOW TO Swimlane in Visio Visio sort key Pen and Touch Creating groups in Windows Server Raid in Windows Server Exchange 2010 maintenance Exchange server mail enabled groups Debugging Tools Collaborating
programming4us programming4us
PS4 game trailer XBox One game trailer
WiiU game trailer 3ds game trailer
Trailer game
 
programming4us
Heroes Charge
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer