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Deploying the Windows Phone 7 Application on the Device

6/28/2011 4:24:50 PM

1. Problem

You want to deploy your application to the Windows Phone 7 device because you have to test the sensors' functionalities.

2. Solution

You have two ways to deploy your application to the phone: using either Visual Studio 2010 or the Application Deployment tool.

3. How It Works

In both cases, you have to download and install the latest version of Zune software from www.zune.net/en-US/. Zune is an entertainment device—initially available only in the United States—and it is Microsoft's response to Apple's iPod family of devices. You can transfer your music and videos by using the Zune software, but you can use it to deploy your software too.

Moreover, in both cases, you have to unlock your Windows Phone device with a developer license. You can obtain a license from Microsoft's App Hub site at http://create.msdn.com/en-us/home/membership by paying an annual $99 fee. In the registration, you will associate your Windows Live ID account with an App Hub identifier. This coupling of data is necessary to unlock your Windows Phone device with the help of the Windows Phone Developer Registration tool, which you find within the tools installed with the Windows Phone Developer Tools (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. The Windows Phone Developer Registration tool used to unlock your phone and deploy applications

NOTE

As you can see in Figure 1, Zune software is required to unlock the Windows Phone 7 device.

Okay, after completing these mandatory steps, your device is ready to receive your application. From Visual Studio 2010, you simply have to change the target combo box from Windows Phone 7 Emulator to Windows Phone 7 Device.

4. Usage

Now, as usual, you can press F5 to start a debug session or press Ctrl+F5 to start the application without the debug. Visual Studio 2010 will compile your application, start Zune software to connect to the Windows Phone device, copy the XAP file to the device, and finally run the application. In your device, you will see your application running.

NOTE

The October 2010 update of the Windows Phone Developer Tools includes the WPConnect.exe program. When your application uses the Windows Phone media library or plays a song, it will find those resources locked by Zune software. You have to close Zune software after having connected the phone and then run WPConnect.exe. The device will remain connected, but now you have full access to the phone device.

The second method to deploy your application on the Windows Phone device is to run the Application Deployment tool (see Figure 2).

Figure 2. The Application Deployment tool used to deploy your application without Visual Studio 2010

The target combo box contains both device and emulator targets. The XAP text box contains the path of your application's XAP file. When you compile your application, Visual Studio 2010 creates the XAP file, which is a compressed file containing everything Windows Phone needs to run the application (EXE, DLLl, images, and so on). After you click the Deploy button, the Application Deployment tool connects to the phone and deploys the application.

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